The inspiration

  • “Mom, did you throw my project away?”

    -Mila, age 5

    Right now, on my kitchen counter, there’s a little corner of it with a stack of my kids’ art. There are water color paintings of animals, first drawn in pen or pencil. There are pages with abstract blotches that hang together in chaotic harmony. There are family portraits made from crayons and markers. The pile grows until I get a moment to sort through them and decide which ones to flip over, write the year on and then tuck them into one of two boxes that sit in a closet — each one labeled with my kids’ names. The rest, I throw away and hope they don’t notice. Except, often they do! This is an attempt to save some more of their art, inspire (or perhaps dissuade other parents!) and find some cool ways to learn about art with them along the way.

  • “Mom, did you throw my project away?”

    -Mila, age 5

    Right now, on my kitchen counter, there’s a little corner of it with a stack of my kids’ art. There are water color paintings of animals, first drawn in pen or pencil. There are pages with abstract blotches that hang together in chaotic harmony. There are family portraits made from crayons and markers. The pile grows until I get a moment to sort through them and decide which ones to flip over, write the year on and then tuck them into one of two boxes that sit in a closet — each one labeled with my kids’ names. The rest, I throw away and hope they don’t notice. Except, often they do! This is an attempt to save some more of their art, inspire (or perhaps dissuade other parents!) and find some cool ways to learn about art with them along the way.

  • “Mom, did you throw my project away?”

    -Mila, age 5

    Right now, on my kitchen counter, there’s a little corner of it with a stack of my kids’ art. There are water color paintings of animals, first drawn in pen or pencil. There are pages with abstract blotches that hang together in chaotic harmony. There are family portraits made from crayons and markers. The pile grows until I get a moment to sort through them and decide which ones to flip over, write the year on and then tuck them into one of two boxes that sit in a closet — each one labeled with my kids’ names. The rest, I throw away and hope they don’t notice. Except, often they do! This is an attempt to save some more of their art, inspire (or perhaps dissuade other parents!) and find some cool ways to learn about art with them along the way.

  • “Mom, did you throw my project away?”

    -Mila, age 5

    Right now, on my kitchen counter, there’s a little corner of it with a stack of my kids’ art. There are water color paintings of animals, first drawn in pen or pencil. There are pages with abstract blotches that hang together in chaotic harmony. There are family portraits made from crayons and markers. The pile grows until I get a moment to sort through them and decide which ones to flip over, write the year on and then tuck them into one of two boxes that sit in a closet — each one labeled with my kids’ names. The rest, I throw away and hope they don’t notice. Except, often they do! This is an attempt to save some more of their art, inspire (or perhaps dissuade other parents!) and find some cool ways to learn about art with them along the way.

  • “Mom, did you throw my project away?”

    -Mila, age 5

    Right now, on my kitchen counter, there’s a little corner of it with a stack of my kids’ art. There are water color paintings of animals, first drawn in pen or pencil. There are pages with abstract blotches that hang together in chaotic harmony. There are family portraits made from crayons and markers. The pile grows until I get a moment to sort through them and decide which ones to flip over, write the year on and then tuck them into one of two boxes that sit in a closet — each one labeled with my kids’ names. The rest, I throw away and hope they don’t notice. Except, often they do! This is an attempt to save some more of their art, inspire (or perhaps dissuade other parents!) and find some cool ways to learn about art with them along the way.

  • “Mom, did you throw my project away?”

    -Mila, age 5

    Right now, on my kitchen counter, there’s a little corner of it with a stack of my kids’ art. There are water color paintings of animals, first drawn in pen or pencil. There are pages with abstract blotches that hang together in chaotic harmony. There are family portraits made from crayons and markers. The pile grows until I get a moment to sort through them and decide which ones to flip over, write the year on and then tuck them into one of two boxes that sit in a closet — each one labeled with my kids’ names. The rest, I throw away and hope they don’t notice. Except, often they do! This is an attempt to save some more of their art, inspire (or perhaps dissuade other parents!) and find some cool ways to learn about art with them along the way.

  • “Mom, did you throw my project away?”

    -Mila, age 5

    Right now, on my kitchen counter, there’s a little corner of it with a stack of my kids’ art. There are water color paintings of animals, first drawn in pen or pencil. There are pages with abstract blotches that hang together in chaotic harmony. There are family portraits made from crayons and markers. The pile grows until I get a moment to sort through them and decide which ones to flip over, write the year on and then tuck them into one of two boxes that sit in a closet — each one labeled with my kids’ names. The rest, I throw away and hope they don’t notice. Except, often they do! This is an attempt to save some more of their art, inspire (or perhaps dissuade other parents!) and find some cool ways to learn about art with them along the way.

  • “Mom, did you throw my project away?”

    -Mila, age 5

    Right now, on my kitchen counter, there’s a little corner of it with a stack of my kids’ art. There are water color paintings of animals, first drawn in pen or pencil. There are pages with abstract blotches that hang together in chaotic harmony. There are family portraits made from crayons and markers. The pile grows until I get a moment to sort through them and decide which ones to flip over, write the year on and then tuck them into one of two boxes that sit in a closet — each one labeled with my kids’ names. The rest, I throw away and hope they don’t notice. Except, often they do! This is an attempt to save some more of their art, inspire (or perhaps dissuade other parents!) and find some cool ways to learn about art with them along the way.

  • “Mom, did you throw my project away?”

    -Mila, age 5

    Right now, on my kitchen counter, there’s a little corner of it with a stack of my kids’ art. There are water color paintings of animals, first drawn in pen or pencil. There are pages with abstract blotches that hang together in chaotic harmony. There are family portraits made from crayons and markers. The pile grows until I get a moment to sort through them and decide which ones to flip over, write the year on and then tuck them into one of two boxes that sit in a closet — each one labeled with my kids’ names. The rest, I throw away and hope they don’t notice. Except, often they do! This is an attempt to save some more of their art, inspire (or perhaps dissuade other parents!) and find some cool ways to learn about art with them along the way.

7 thoughts on “The inspiration

  1. I love Mila’s watercolors so much! And I love that you’re talking about symbolism and what’s hiding in paintings with her- it’s like a game to play together, trying to identify all the symbols and what they might mean.

    My daughter and I were obsessed with art when she was about the same age as Mila, and it was such a pleasure to go to museums and have her be able to connect what we were reading and talking about at home with what she was seeing there. We would make up all kinds of stories about who people in the paintings were and what they might be thinking about. It’s such a pleasure to be able to share art with kids.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I LOVE THIS! I am a fellow mom and love seeing what my kids can create! During Covid my 6 year old an dI would pick something and then try to paint it. It was so relaxing and fun for us. You have taken it a step further by also learning about art. Its a unique idea and I cant wait to see more!

      Liked by 1 person

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